Recommended Books

 
   

Some of these books have recently been banned in Arizona, USA. And when something gets banned it's all the more a sign of them being worth reading, isn't it? All the controversial truths that governments don't want you to know, and that of course includes a lot more than just the US, but also Canada and all the Latin American countries. All in all very much worth reading they are.

 
   

Rethinking Columbus the next 500 years

 
One of the books recently banned in Arizona, US. And when something gets banned it's all the more a sign of being worth reading, isn't it? The truth that governments don't want you to know
   

Bill Bigelow and Bob Peterson

   

Pedagogy of the oppressed

 
 
   

Paolo Freirre

   

El se˝or presidente

 
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Miguel ┴ngel Asturias

   

Our word is our weapon

 
   
Selected writings by the charismatic Mexican Zapatista leader Subcomandante Marcos.

Subcomandante Marcos

   

I, Rigoberta Mench˙: an Indian woman in Guatemala

 
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Rigoberta Mench˙

   

Bury my heart at Wounded Knee

 
No, this is not about the film but about the book. The book is certainly much better and the film was a major biased disappointment in my opinion, especially the scene in which director Yves Simoneau lets General Miles (Shaun Johnson) have a big argument with Sitting Bull (August Schellenberg) providing the audience with a pretext and historical whitewashing excuse to take the land from the Sioux Indians, which definitely couldn't have been what Dee Brown had intended with his book. The book is an account of the Indian point of view be it written down by a white man. The film however, although showing the mistreatment at boarding schools and displaying some of the Indian way of looking at things, also reenforced stereotypes like scalping like it was something only done by natives and not my white people. Forget the film, read the book. It's an eye opener to many people.
   

Dee Brown

   

Indigenous archaeologies

 
   

a reader on decolonization

Indigenous archaeologies. Finally a type of archaeology that's not into desecrating graves or looking or hidden treasures but about preserving sacred sites of native peoples if carried out by native peoples, now catching on in America and Australia.

Margareth Bruchac

   

Back then tomorrow

 
 
   

Peter Blue Cloud